Andre’s Amazon Archive for 8/16/2014: ‘Black And White America’ by Lenny Kravitz

Lenny Kravitz

With this release Lenny Kravitz finds himself consummating the musical direction he began with his 5 but for some reason backed away from. As with myself Lenny is the product of a biracial family. And he likely faced some of the cultural ambiguities that I often had to contend with. Especially on the creative end. He spent much of his career on the path to being the modern equivalent of a Jimi Hendrix or Vernon Reid-using rock guitar and the rock ‘n roll style as his main choice of expression. On this album all of that is beginning to change. Recorded in the Bahamas with the environment having it’s own type of effect on the music this is also his debut for the Roadrunner label. It’s a branch of Atlantic-former home of famous soul icons Aretha Franklin,Ray Charles…the list goes on. So it’s only fitting,with the idea of the classic Atlantic soul style still felt today that this would be the album where Lenny would officially find the funk in all it’s fruitful forms.

This album begins with a serious punch on the title song,an autobiographic number fully exploring the pumping sophistifunk/dance style of the mid/late 70’s,celebrating his biracial heritage and how the modern age is far more accommodating to that despite the socio political racial tensions bought home in today’s world. On “Come And Get It”,”Superlove” and the JB sendup “Life Ain’t Ever Better Than It Is Now” he extends the funk into his sound more than he has on any other album. And he isn’t finished exploring this melodic groove after that either. On the pulsing “Liquid Jesus” where Lenny brings his falsetto back out and,the acid jazz ARP synth laden “Looking Back On Love” and the “boogie” style of “Sunflower” he’s fully acknowledging the 1980’s method of funk. It doesn’t end there. “Boogie Drop” featuring Drake explores a very unique direction in funk-finding Lenny being a pioneer for once in mixing modern electro revival with strong West Indian rhythms and hip-hop touches.

One of the best part of this album is on “Rock Star City Life”,”In The Black”,”Everything”,”The Faith Of A Child” and “Push” it’s clear the influence of 80’s new wave,itself heavily derived from funk and disco is having a very positive effect on these rockier songs. The noisy guitars are pushed to the backround as rhythm becomes the center of attention. On the hit “Stand” he’s come to the ultimate hybrid of Sly Stone,Prince and OutKast’s Andre 3000 in terms of delivering rock n roll influenced funk with a highly melodic nature. So for the first time I’ve heard Lenny delivers an album of sixteen songs where not one tune disappoints. From the wonderfully relevant cover artwork to the wonderfully way he’s embraced the production medium of the jazz,funk and danceable hip-hop he’s now bought into his orbit this finds Lenny at long last becoming himself as a musical entity. More over the fact that he’s broadened his message to showcase how his conscious bohemian outlook can benefit the current generational cycle. If this is to be the path he’s going to chose to develop in terms of funk,rock and/or the other in the

*Click here for original Amazon.com review!

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Filed under 1970's, 1990s, Acid Jazz, Amazon.com, Aretha Franklin, Funk, Funk Bass, Hip-Hop, James Brown, Lenny Kravitz, Music Reviewing

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