Prince Summer: “Pretty Man” (1999)

Prince’s final jam of the year for the 1990’s was 1999’s Rave Un2 The Joy Fantastic. This one and only Prince album on Arista derived from the artist’s legendary vault of unreleased music. One well known song was an outtake from the 1988  album Lovesexy. It was the new albums title song,and a funky one at that. The remainder of the album was catchy pop/rock  oriented music featuring then very popular guests such as Ani DiFranco and Sheryl Crow. Public Enemy’s Chuck D even appeared on the hip-hop flavored “Undisputed”. Personally,this album had other levels of significance.

This would be the final album released by The Artist Formerly Known As Prince-using his O(+> glyph. It was pretty commercially successful at the time. Yet even though I personally was very interested in Prince,I avoided the album for years. This was due to one major moment of caving into record store peer pressure saying that this new Prince album was being out funked by Beck’s Midnight Vultures-released several days before it. A decade later,I began to see right through that statement and picked up the CD. I enjoyed much of it. But it was a hidden track called “Prettyman” that really stuck out most.

A fast paced drum shuffle,consistently accented by cowbell,gets the groove going and remains steady throughout most of it. A slippery bass line plays every note not heard within the fairly simple chords of the song for a thick bottom. Along with turn-tabling that brings in high pitched horn blast samples.  Maceo Parker accents Prince’s chicken scratch rhythm guitar through a serious of calculated breaks-eventually coming back for Maceo to take one of his iconic sax solos. By the end,Prince is adding squiggly synth organ tones as he and Maceo solo fade the song right out to the sound of a glassy smash.

It was James Brown’s full rhythm approach that inspired Prince’s own type of funk from the outset. This can be heard as far back as 1987’s “Housequake”. On this song however,Prince isn’t just modernizing the JB funk sound: he’s outright re-creating it. Maceo Parker had by this time taken a journey through the three key phases of funk-through James Brown,P-Funk and winding up with Prince. And just at the time that the Minneapolis icon was finding his inner JB most fully. This approach to funk would be the one Prince would work around for much of the rest of his career as it turned out.

 

 

 

 

 

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3 Comments

Filed under 1990s, Arista Records, chicken scratch guitar, drums, Funk, Funk Bass, James Brown, Maceo Parker, Minneapolis, Minneapolis Sound, Prince, Sampling, Saxophone, synthesizer, The Artist Formerly Known As Prince

3 responses to “Prince Summer: “Pretty Man” (1999)

  1. It is interesting how Prince returned to his influences much more directly around 2000. The Rainbow Children almost sounded more “’70s” than anything he actually recorded in the ’70s, and of course Musicology was a very deliberate throwback. Personally, I always thought he sounded more comfortable innovating from his influences rather than directly paying homage to them–“Prettyman” is good, but something like “Get on the Boat” just sounded like James with all the grit sucked out of him. I guess restless, nonstop innovation isn’t really a feasible blueprint for a 40-year career, though.

  2. Pingback: Prince (Protégé) Summer: Támar, Bria Valente, Andy Allo, and Judith Hill | Andresmusictalk

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