A Few Words on Public Enemy, 30 Black History Months In

It’s almost too fitting that the anniversary of Public Enemy’s debut album should fall during Black History Month. For people like me–’90s kids from majority-white towns where “Black History” meant half a class period on George Washington Carver every February–Public Enemy was our connection to an invisible history of Black radical thought: from Marcus Garvey and W.E.B. Du Bois to Malcolm X and Huey P. Newton. Their music opened me up to ideas I didn’t even know existed; ideas that, in the wilderness of White (supremacist) America, were truly life-altering. Discovering P.E. as a teenager was an experience as radicalizing as discovering punk rock; more so, in fact, because they represented a threat to racial hegemony that even the likes of the Clash did not. They were insurrection in musical form, with a visceral cut-and-paste aesthetic that continues to sound cutting-edge to this day.

None of that, of course, was the point of Public Enemy. More than any other rap group of their era, P.E. was music by and for Black people; the radicalized white kids like me were collateral damage. But I can only speak from my experience, as someone for whom Fear of a Black Planet and, especially, It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back were an introduction to an entirely new kind of politics, a new way of seeing the world. If nothing else, I have Public Enemy to thank for introducing me to a rich canon of African American literature and art: to Stokely Carmichael, Angela Davis, James Baldwin, and Toni Morrison, and for that matter to James Brown, John Coltrane, and Gil Scott-Heron. Without that initial spark of interest I felt the first time I heard “Bring the Noise,” I might have missed out on a whole universe of ideas that have made me a definitively better person.

Granted, not everything about the group has aged well. Public Enemy may have exposed millions of listeners like myself to Black Power and the Panthers, but they also regurgitated a lot of less progressive influences: the anti-Semitism and homophobia of Louis Farrakhan, most famously, along with a host of conspiracy theories and pseudo-history that contemporary listeners are likely to file away as Hotep bullshit. Their politics are more akin to a firebrand anarchist zine than a well-reasoned essay–which is probably why they appealed more to my teenage self than they do to me as an adult. But there will always be a place for firebrands, and P.E. were as incendiary as they came: it was what made us sit up and listen in the first place. And in early 2017–a time when racism in America is arguably the worst it’s been in my lifetime–their fire might just be needed more than ever.

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4 Comments

Filed under 1980's, 1987, 1988, conscious rap, James Brown, John Coltrane, Malcolm X, Public Enemy, rap

4 responses to “A Few Words on Public Enemy, 30 Black History Months In

  1. Great reading your first impressions of Public Enemy. A neighbor kid of my family’s gave my dad his tape of ‘It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back’…because he preferred Kid ‘N Play. When I heard ‘You Bum Rush The Show’ several years ago,it didn’t remind me of the PE I knew. Your observations remind me a lot of my own.

  2. Great stuff. i couldn’t believe it when a friend lent me ‘Nation of Millions’ and they were far heavier than all the metal bands I’d been listening to up until then!

    ‘Fear of a Black Planet’ is a stone-cold masterpiece in my opinion.

    • “Fear of a Black Planet” is the ONE for me. It’s even greater than “Nation of Millions” in my opinion because the sound is funkier and bass heavier and the sweep of issues were wide, from interracial relationships, to Hollywoods portrayal of Black people, to police killing, to unity songs. They even had a rabble rousing down south, 2 Live Crew beat (Power to the People)!

  3. Pingback: From the Vault: Public Enemy’s MKLVFKWR Manchester UK Live – Dystopian Dance Party

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