Quincy Delight Jones-The Funk Years: 1974 to 1978

Quincy 1974-1978

Quincy Jones is one of the artists who has happily survived what I’m now calling the “funkapocalypse” of 2016. There were periods during that time when it seemed as if Q’s passing would be announced any day. Of course one day,he’ll no longer be with us. But it did remind me to celebrate his contributions in more pronounced ways. He will be 84 years old today. Quincy is a man who,as many jazz based artists of his day were,innovated during a number of distinct musical periods as probably jazz’s ultimate “jelly maker” as it were. At the same time,his name got so big he shook quite a lot of metaphorical trees as well.

During the 1970’s,Quincy actually went through three periods as far as his own releases a leader went. His first,beginning in the late 60s, was doing elaborate arrangements of contemporary show tunes from plays like Hair. Directly after that,beginning in 1971,he entered his TV theme period-showcasing long versions of his themes from shows such as Ironside,Sanford & Son and the Bill Cosby variety show Coz in the song  “Chump Change”. During this period,particularly with another Cosby collaboration in “Hicky Burr”, Quincy began to heavily embrace the jazz-funk sound that was then at a major peak.

1974’s Body Heat got the party started with some seriously heavy Moog bass oriented grooves in its slow jamming title song,”Soul Saga (Song For The Buffalo Solider” as well as the heavy funk jams of “Boogie Joe The Organ Grinder” and “Just A Man”. This album prominently features the talents of the recently departed Leon Ware. George and the late Louis Johnson made their recorded debut as artists on the next album in 1975’s Mellow Madness.  Leon Ware adds his own “Paranoid” to the brew while “Tryin’ To Find Out About You” and “Cry Baby” are yet more heavy funky things to play with.

The Brothers Johnson’s contributions to the album included the catchy groove of “Is It Love That We’re Missing” along with more gurgling numbers such as “Listen (What It Is)” and “Just A Little Taste Of Me”. 1976’s I Heard That! was predominantly a double album compilation of his A&M era hits. Yes the first side featured the group Wattsline on a handful of new tracks-the funkiest of which were the opening title song and the ARP synthesizer explosion of “Midnight Soul Patrol”. These were very much in line with some of his funk productions for other artists during this time.

1978’s Sounds…and stuff like that marked the introduction of Patti Austin into the Quincy Jones camp. She duetted with Chaka Khan on the thumping disco funk classic “Stuff Like That”-possibly my favorite Quincy Jones funk groove during the 70’s period. Austin also takes on Stevie Wonder’s “Superwoman” here with that funkier groove as well as on the gurgling funky soul of “Love,I Never Had It So Good”-not to mention the cinematic take on Herbie Hancock’s “Tell Me A Bedtime Story”. The album ends with the late Gwen Guthrie and Luther Vandross on the gospel rave up of “Takin’ It To The Streets”.

Its astounding to think that all the funky classics on these four albums also came during the same period that Quincy was spinning groove gold for The Brothers Johnson,scoring the iconic TV miniseries Roots, the movie adaption of The Wiz  and was then about to help make Michael Jackson an icon of his generation. That shows you just how much the funk was flowing through Quincy’s jazziness during this time period-it needed as many outlets,performers and musicians as possible to manifest itself. Really showcased how,for himself and many others, Quincy Jones knows how to get great music made.

 

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