Mac Rebennack In The Right Place: The 45th Anniversary Of Dr. John’s Classic 1973 Album

Dr John is truly in a class by himself. I’ve seen the man live. And in that context, I can utter him in the same sentence as James Brown, Ray Charles, Stevie Wonder and Aretha Franklin. You hear this guy, there’s instant recognition. It’s his musical sound. In terms of sheer funkitivity this album is a dream come true. His band on this album is the Meters. It was produced by Allen Toussaint. And it was recorded in 1973 at the height of the funk era. So if you go into this album expecting something different thank funk,funk and more funk? You indeed probably are not in “the right place”.

The album opens up with the title track…I don’t think I can say anymore. It’s one of those select few bonafide funk songs that almost everybody knows . On “Same Old Place”? Surprise surprise; more slinky,swampy Clavinet driven funk of the highest order. On “Just The Same”,”Qualified” and “Travelling Mood” there’s a tad bit more of a relaxed soul atmosphere to it. But the songs are no less in the groove. On “Peace Brother Peace” the funk is back full throttle,like Sly Stone in the Bayou with those calling horns and Dr John belting out a “people music” lyric about world peace not being merely a far off slogan.

And he does have the effect of making even the most offbeat things as real as one would want them to be. “Life” continues on this theme,with some great piano licks and a strong melody to boot. On “Such A Night” there’s a heavy dixieland jazz style soul-pop flavor to the proceedings. “Shoo Fly Marches On” and “I Been Hoodood” are the deepest, swampiest funk here and the closer “Cold Cold Cold” brings The Meters own sound more strongly in Dr. John’s sound. Almost everything this guy gets his claws into is going to be dripping from side to side with funk. Always has been that way for him.

In The Right Place is definitely a full on funk album. The Crescent City, from where Dr. John and The Meters come, is probably the main origin point for funk as a social concept. In the late 19th century, a musician named Buddy Bolden, often credited for being the first person to play jazz, played an original number of his called “The Funky Butt”. This might’ve been the birth of the term funk in a musical context. In The Right Place comes  from it’s early 70’s as some of the most rooted, vital funk of it’s era. Its also one of Dr John’s classic albums. And it couldn’t deserve that status more if it tried.

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