Category Archives: Carlos Alomar

Anatomy Of THE Groove For The Brothers And Sisters Who Aren’t Here: “Golden Years” by David Bowie

Just before bed last night, I learned that David Bowie had passed away earlier in the day at age 69. It would seem he was dealing with terminal cancer for the last 18 months. He recorded a final album entitled Blackstar, a darkly jazzy exploration he recorded while ill and released on what turned out to be his final birthday. During  his near half century as a recording artist? He was extremely prolific and musically challenging. So while I just dealt with Bowie last week? Wanted to extend on the tribute since he’s completed a cycle from birthday to grave.

With Bowie’s mid/late 70’s change in persona from Ziggy Stardust and Aladdin Sane to the Thin White Duke, musical transitions were happening with him even thicker and faster. For the most part? Bowie’s 1976 album  Station To Station reflected his burgeoning interest in an ambient type of electronic Kraut rock. But still there was a lot of the Philly influence still left in his sound at that point. With Carlos Alomar really at the peak of his powers with Bowie? A new hit and tremendous creative triumph emerged from this groove entitled “Golden Years”.

A brushing percussion and hand clap powered rhythm provides the intro to the jam-accompanied by Alomar’s thick and phat rhythm guitar chug and a bluesy harmonica. This segues right into the percussive,marching main rhythm of the song itself. Alomar’s guitar on the rest of the song is a densely mixed polyphony of bass and higher pitched phased tones. The refrains of the song are more brightly melodic-with a ringing bell like percussion bringing in the joy even more. The song basically outro’s on the main chorus that maintains itself throughout.

What “Golden Years” does is showcase how Bowie was able to do within the black music spectrum what the Rolling Stones did: evolve with the changes of the music. So this finds Bowie’s funk transitioning into the disco era with a lean toward the four on the floor beat. It all makes sense with change being the key fixture in Bowie’s musical career as well. It’s also a great lyric with him encouraging a young,attractive lady to believe in herself because “nothin’s gonna touch you in your golden years”. For this and many dozens of musical reasons? David Bowie will be missed.

 

 

 

 

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Filed under 1970's, cancer, Carlos Alomar, classic funk, David Bowie, Funk, percussion, Philly Soul, Rolling Stones, Uncategorized

Anatomy of THE Groove: “Fame” by David Bowie

From his early years performing  Anthony Newley style show tunes about laughing gnomes up through his persona as Ziggy Stardust? David Jones (better known by his stage name of Bowie) celebrated an embrace of musical and thematic eclecticism. Rock played a big part in it. But he also drew a good dose of inspiration from the rhythmic timing of funk and soul. After his most iconic years as the glam rock icon of Ziggy and the related character Aladdin Sane? Bowie began sporting white soul boy suits,slicked back hair and focusing on that soulful end of his sound.

It got going for Bowie in 1974 when his Diamond Dogs album came out-it’s Isaac Hayes inspired song”1984″ drawing him to a new group of session musicians and singers than the Spiders From Mars. In addition to the presence of David Sanborn and Luther Vandross,t he main drive behind this change was Puerto Rican guitarist Carlos Alomar. As a composer and arranger? He really understood how to rock up the funk. This led to the final number on Bowie’s soul oriented Young Americans album of 1975 ending with a collaboration with John Lennon entitled “Fame”.

An ascending backwards guitar opens the song into a more reverbed one. A brushing drum roll and acoustic guitar introduces the the slow grooving funky drummer that’s accompanied by three different guitar riffs-each playing off the one another. One is a low liquid one providing the bass line, the other is a more popping one of the same tone while each instrumental refrain is accented by a ringing high rhythm guitar. Bowie and Lennon’s vocals,both in their lower and high ranges,duet in near incoherence until descending into a chant of the song title at the end.

Together,Bowie and Alomar’s sound on this song heavily channels James Brown’s variety of funk. Everything about this song, itself built around layers of bass toned and higher pitched guitar, is entire built on Brown’s understanding of all the instrumentation being “on the one” with rhythm. Melody,harmony and all. The interesting this is? Brown himself was in turn inspired to work his own song “Hot (I Need To Be Love)” directly out of this groove the following year. So along with being a huge hit for Bowie, it’s an example of the cross pollination of funk in it’s prime.

 

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Filed under 1975, Carlos Alomar, David Bowie, Funk, funk guitar, funk/rock, glam rock, James Brown, John Lennon, rock 'n' roll, rock guitar, Uncategorized