Category Archives: Keni Burke

Anatomy of THE Groove: “From Us To You” by Stairsteps

The Five Stairsteps were the prototype family soul group-predating the Jackson 5 and The Sylvers by several years. They were made up of five out of the six children of Betty and Clarence Burke,a detective for the CPD. They were Alohe Jean, James, Clarence Jr., Dennis and Kenneth-known as Keni. For a brief time, the late Cubie Burke (the youngest brother” was part of the outfit.  The became known as Chicago’s “first family of soul”. Their second album Our Family Portrait  yeilded the hit “Something’s Missing’. But their best known song was 1970’s “O-o-h Child”.

By that time, the group were known as The Stairsteps. Alohe left the group in 1972. This was just before the group were brought to The Beatles attention by Billy Preston. After a five year hiatus, Preston and Robert Margouleff all came together to produce a comeback along with The Stairsteps-in their new configuration as a quartet. This 1976 album was entitled 2nd Resurrection. I’ve never heard the entire album. But what I’ve heard about it is that, it had a more synthesizer oriented sound. One song I did hear from it was the Keni Burke composition “From Us To You”.

Alvin Taylor’s drums come right in along with Preston’s wailing synthesizer. It keeps a steady, occasionally marching rhythm throughout.  The main melody is first played by the harmonizing of Preston’s synth and Dennis Burke’s guitar for a massive melodic sound. This also represents the chorus of the song. Between each chorus, Preston harmonizes with himself on his honky tonk piano, bluesy polyphonic synth riffing and sustained organ. For much of the rest of the song, the Stairsteps vocal harmonies and adlibs sing right along with Preston until the organ fades out on the main melody.

“From Us To You” doesn’t sound to me like anything I’d ever think The Five Stairsteps (by any other name) would do. The drawling chorus, style of singalong melody and the thick groove of the music is far closer in flavor to the Brothers Johnson’s “I’ll Be Good To You” or a Graham Central Station number. Of course, Billy Preston’s instrumentation probably has a lot to do with its heavy funkiness. Interestingly enough, the Preston connection got the band signed to George Harrison’s Dark Horse label to make this album as well. And it certainly started with a strongly funkified new direction for them.

 

 

 

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Filed under Keni Burke, The Five Stairsteps

Grooves On Wax: Post Disco Boogie (1979-1982)

Kleer

Kleer were a band whom I’d heard about for years,but never really explored their music. This 1979 sophomore album from this New York band showcases some of the ideal elements of the post disco sound. All of the songs,even the mid tempo ballads,have a heavy funk stop to them. Still the orchestrated strings and vocal harmonies from the height of the disco era are still a big part of these very well constructed,produced and played on funk jams.

Key Jams: “Winners”,”Rollin’ On” and “Open Your Mind”

Switch II

Switch were musically speaking Motown’s closest equivalent to Earth Wind & Fire in terms of sound: big melodic sound that was filled with personality. Featuring the two elder DeBarge brothers in Tommy and the the late Bobby,as well as James Ingram’s brother Phillip,this band had the talent of being able to switch off instruments while playing. Hence their name. Everything from the ballads,funk and disco oriented numbers  on this 1979 sophomore album of their’s were full of class and talent. Including the moments group mentor Jermaine Jackson stepped in to help out.

Key Jams: “Next To You” and “Go On Doin’ What You Feel”

Dazz Band

As the 1980 Motown debut for the group formerly known as Philip Bailey’s pet project Kinsman Dazz, this really showcased horn players/singer/songwriter’s  Bobby Harris and Skip Martin’s talents at blending a strong post disco pop funk sound with plenty of instrumentally jazzy touches.  On this and it’s follow up Let The Music Play,the Dazz Band were not yet the electro funk juggernaut of the middle of the decade. Still their sound as evolving in another way.

Key Jams: “Shake It Up” and “Beyond The Horizon”

Invisable Mans Band

This 1981 album is actually the sophomore one of two albums released by this Five Stairstep’s spin off act. The album is full of some very saucy P-Funk influences-especially when it comes to Keni Burke’s thick,up front bass lines and the flamboyant vocals and arrangements.

Key Jams: “Really Wanna See Ya”,”Party Time” and “Same Thang”

Blow

Bobby Militello played sax with Maynard Ferguson during the height of his fusion period in the late 70’s. Apparently at the strong suggestion of Rick James,the newly rechristened Bobby M signed to Motown to record this 1982 album. Not only did it feature powerful vocals from Jean Carn on a version of Al Green’s “Let’s Stay Together”,but the writing and production of Jamaica,Queens musical icons Lenny White and Bernard Wright were the icing on the cake.

Key Jams: “Alto Man”,”Blow” and “Rome Tones”

 

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Filed under 1970's, 1980's, Bobby Militello, Boogie Funk, Dazz Band, Invisible Man's Band, Keni Burke, Kleer, Motown, post disco, Switch, Vinyl