Category Archives: Malcolm Cecil

Anatomy of THE Groove: “Show Bizness” by Gil Scott-Heron and Brian Jackson

Gil Scott Heron described himself as a “bluesologist” in his 1982 concert film  Black Wax. In a lot of ways,that pretty much describes the entire lexicon of black American music. From jazz up to funk. In the beginning of his recording career in the late 60’s/early 70’s,Heron was recording primarily spoken word poetry over Afro-Latin percussion. Gradually the arrangements swelled to included jazzier electric pianos and bass lines. By the time he began collaborating with keyboardist Brian Jackson in the mid 70’s,Heron was singing. And his music was on the forefront of socially conscious,poetic jazz-funk music.

After having been signed to Arista since 1975,Gil and Brian eventually reduced the participation of their instrumental ensemble The Midnight Band and began working more with Malcolm Cecil on his TONTO synthesizer complex. Their 1977 album Bridges began the pairs focus on creating new synthesized musical worlds for Heron’s songs to live in. Their follow up album was 1978’s Secrets. This album garnered Heron a Top 20 R&B hit in the funky groove of “Angel Dust”. This was an album chocked full of funky grooves. But the one that’s standing out for me right now is called “Show Bizness”.

The song starts off with a high pitched synthesizer playing “There’s No Business Like Show Business” in the minor key. This is done over a brittle electric piano and a thick layer of synth bass and steady drumming. The remainder of the song lays that grooving, percussive synth bass down-and locks it right in tightly. From the chorus to the refrain, higher pitched synth lines play melodic call and response support to Heron’s vocal leads. And to that of the upfront backup singers as well.  That lead synth that started out the sng brings it on home with a very jazzy blues style melody.

Instrumentally speaking,this album was presented to me by friend Henrique as being an example of Stevie Wonder’s sonic influence on musicians. And this song in particular does have a similar musical vibe to Stevie’s “Jesus Christ Children Of America”. With the decedent wealth of Donald Trump making this current US presidential election such a high stakes,yet almost farcical mess this song has deep resonance now. And with the future election of President Reagan.  It takes of ignoring social decline when gaining fame. And that makes it a strong synth funk process number aimed at the idea of celebrity itself.

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Filed under 1970's, blues funk, Brian Jackson, drums, electric piano, Gil Scott Heron, Malcolm Cecil, message songs, synth bass, synth funk, synthesizers, TONTO