Category Archives: Roland CR-78 drum machine

Anatomy of THE Groove: “I Can’t Go For That (No Can Do)” by Hall & Oates

Daryl Hall & John Oates have been part of the soundtrack to the lives of millions of pop music lovers of the early/mid 1980’s. These Philly natives had a handful of smash singles in the mid to late 70’s. And unlike many white artists doing soul/funk they (in a similar manner to Boz Scaggs and The Rolling Stones),they innovated and embraced the side of the genre that was contemporary at the time. When they began producing their own records starting with 1980’sĀ Voices,they soon found themselves the most commercially (and in my opinion,creative) American duo of the 80’s decade.

Personally I had the pleasure of seeing Daryl and John perform live at the Darlings Waterfront Pavilion in Bangor,Maine this past summer. It amazed my ears to not only hear them abstract on their classic hit songs in a very instrumental way,but how positively the audiences responded to them. One of these hits reminded me of the very first pop song I remembering hearing-likely at around 3 years old at the Bangor Mall. Over the years,its become of those songs that defines my listening tastes for its melodic and solid musicality. The name of the 1981 song is “I Can’t Go That (No Can Do)”.

Daryl Hall’s Roland CR-78 drum machine,reverbed by echo on each beat,begins the songs soloing before John Siegler’s upfront,8 note bass line chimes right in. Than Hall’s glistening,high pitched synthesizer comes in. That along with John Oates chunky rhythm guitar and another counter keyboard from Hall. That countering keyboard duets with Hall’s vocals-even on the chorus when he and Oates are harmonizing on the choruses. Charles DeChant takes a beautiful sax solo on the bridge that’s heavy on melodic sustain. All before Daryl and John riff on the chorus until the song fades out.

This is probably my very favorite Hall & Oates hit from their early 80’s run. It has all the hallmarks I love about them. The emphasis on the heavy drum machine rhythm/bass interaction,the choral modulations and harmonic complexity and still providing the capacity for the listeners to tap their foot and sing along to it. Its prime #1 funk for 1981. So much so that it inspired Michael Jackson while making his blockbuster albumĀ Thriller‘s hit “Billie Jean”. Its one of those great examples of how putting energy into the musical aspects of a song,not just the performance,that makes a huge hit funky and eternal.

 

 

 

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Filed under 1980's, Brothers Johnson, Charles DeChant, Daryl Hall, Funk, Funk Bass, Hall & Oates, John Siegler, rhythm guitar, Roland CR-78 drum machine, Saxophone, synthesizer