Category Archives: The S.O.S Band

Anatomy of THE Groove: “High Hopes” by The S.O.S Band

The S.O.S Band (standing for “Sound Of Success”) was originally formed in 1977 in Atlanta,Georgia. They were originally named Santa Monica, but later changed their name. Clarence Avant was impressed enough with the bands demos to sign The S.O.S Band to his label Tabu in the late 70’s. Tabu would shortly become known for being among a series of independent black owned labels (such as Solar),inspired by Motown, which focused on R&B and funk acts. And S.O.S Band became a flagship act for Tabu with their self titled debut album in 1980 and its smash hit “Take Your Time (Do It Right)”.

After S.O.S’s second albumĀ Too,a creatively strong record focusing on message songs and even a jazzy instrumental,didn’t do well commercially the band turned to Rickey Sylvers to produce their third album. This album was calledĀ III. This album generally found The S.O.S Band moving towards a more synthesizer based sound-as opposed to focusing on the rhythm and horn sections. One song on the album is noted for being the first outside production for early Time members Terry Lewis and Jimmy Jam,celebrating a birthday today. The name of this song was “High Hopes”.

A fairly slow drum beat and a 5 note slap bass line provide the intro to the song. As the intro progresses,a low 16 note rhythm guitar becomes part of the mix before a brief drum march inaugurates the main theme of the song. This represents both the chorus and refrain of this song. This adds two main synth parts to the song. One is a textural pad ,the other is a high pitched, more brittle new wave style arpeggiated line. Each respond to the other. After each section there’s a synth/drum breakdown. The bridge breaks into to intro with an added rhythm guitar before the chorus fades it out.

“High Hopes” brings together the sleek new boogie/post disco variant of S.O.S Band’s evolving funk sound and the more condensed approach of Minneapolis. The instrumental production of the song is stripped down. Yet the polish of an experienced live band defines the slinky groove Jam & Lewis wrote and produced for them. While this production would be part of a series of events that wound lead to Jam & Lewis being thrown out of The Time,it would begin their career as THE production team representing twin city funk for the rest of the 80’s.

 

 

 

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