Tag Archives: Brit funk

Funky Revelations Of 1987: ‘The Cost Of Loving’ by The Style Council

The Cost Of Loving is an album that I’ve heard many times. And have a special affinity for. Paul Weller’s earlier records for with the Style Council were fairly diverse musically  And they met with mixed results from both fans and critics. . For the most part, the results of this album commercially weren’t mixed. And they weren’t that great either.  Its possible that lack of accolades this album receives has to do with this music by and large is not only uptempo. But is based in different varieties of funk. The Style Council themselves went through an interesting process in the conception of this album too.

Some of the tracks from this album were also featured in a short film The Style Council made called JerUSAlem.  The album itself was recorded in the autumn of 1986. But was released early in 1987. And its overall sound is very much bound to the international musical explosions pf that year. Obviously inspired by the music that Jam & Lewis were putting out during this time period “It Didn’t Matter” resulted in,musically one of the finest singles the band had put together thus far with it’s strong synth bass line,rhythm guitar and fairly slow dance beat-great in the mid 80’s funk context.

“Right To Go” is just out and out funk with one of the finest and most obvious bass lines of any of their songs and features an Reagan/Thatcher-based political rap by the UK’s own Dynamic Three. “Heavens Above” ups the tempo a bit and concentrates heavily on the drumming and the rhythm and a well executed use of horns. On “Fairy Tales” and the title song there’s a bit more of a balance between the slower beat and the horn oriented sound. There are also three ballads here in “Waiting”,which is beautifully structured 80′ soul in the same way as the Dee C Lee sung “Angel” and “A Woman’s Song” are.

Perhaps it was the heavy funk and R&B content from someone like Weller, who apparently had other expectations of himself, from the following he had earlier. Earlier Style Council music by and large focused on 60’s R&B and soul-jazz. With only the occasional nod to this type of music. And with very sleek production as well. However this album thoroughly acknowledged the 70’s in the music. And because of the closeness to that decade maybe it wasn’t given the kind of recognition it  deserves. Especially considering the high quality of the songwriting,musicianship and general atmospherics.

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‘Faith’ In Its 30th Year: George Michael Goes Solo!

 

George Michael’s solo debut album Faith won’t officially turn 30 for another couple of months. Just couldn’t wait to discuss this particular album. It came along during that 1986-1988 time period that my friend Henrique and I often discussed. It was a period where rock and pop artists could again integrate elements of funk and soul into their music. Where guitar based rock across entire albums was no longer the standard. Danceable,funky music was making a huge comeback in 1987 in particular. And George Michael began his solo career right in that creative frame of mind.

For his part, George Michael basically made a move that would follow onto what Justin Timberlake would do 15 years later: leave a group that was popular with the teen set and emerge with a rather adult solo album. And even Don, the owner of the local record store in Bangor Maine called Dr. Records praised Faith as the very finest album George Michael made. I also have personal memories connected to it-especially seeing its video clips as part of the Friday Night Videos TV magazine program. What I wanted to present here today is a review I wrote on Amazon.com for the album six years ago.


Interesting how you can like a piece of music on one level but have it grow on you in totally different ways. Of course one of the things that has made this album special to me is how it’s stood the passage of time. Didn’t seem that way living through it but the late 1980’s were actually a pretty divided time in terms of pop music. There was a lot of discontentment at how things were going,in terms of popularity versus creativity,that would only really come to the surface years later.

In terms of where George Michael stood at this point,Wham! had gone out on one final tour following their last release Music From the Edge of Heaven and it was time for George to go out on his own. It had been coming for some time. In fact many contend that Wham! owes every single bit of it’s musical potency to his talent. Where George’s talents played an enormous part in it,there was an actual band involved and Andrew Ridgley who was perceived more as pure eye candy.

It was mostly teen idol folly to a degree. But the talent was there in George. So where exactly was he going to take it the first time out? The title song itself and it’s video,sporting George playing a mean rockabilly in leather and jeans is a great,soulful rocker. An obvious hit. Same goes for the slower “Father Figure” with it’s mixture of Eastern melodies,gospel choirs and twisted sexual fantasy.

What makes this album most notable to me is even on those,but more for the rest of the album it totally rejects the fluffier pop melodies on Wham!’s previous two albums in favor of extending more on the sound of the debut album Fantastic. In short this finds it’s success on all accounts by being a very muscular contemporary soul/funk album. The surprisingly un-commercial 9+ minute hit “I Want Your Sex” is a great example.

Starting as stripped down Minneapolis type funk it goes into this live band funk part,complete with a hot horn section. “One More Try” is a spare ballad in the spirit of “A Different Corner” from that final Wham! album. “Hard Day” gets into some heavy old school hip-hop/80’s funk grooves. “Hand To Mouth” tells a compelling street corner story with a breezier funky soul dance type rhythm. “Look At Your Hands” comes to terms with a vibrant rock and soul type number.

On “Monkey”,George deals with his lovers drug problems (so it would seem) over some heavy 80’s Cameo type funk. “Kissing A Fool” is a very 50’s style soul ballad,in the spirit of Ray Charles using something jazz oriented instrumentation. A modern day standard,if you will. There’s a heavy hip-hop/scratch influenced Shep Pettibone remix of “Hard Day” here too as well as “A Last Request” which,listed as “I Want Your Sex Part 3” is an electronic percussive Brit-Funk type number.

One of my favorites here really. So it was a massive hit and likely outsold Wham!’s three records combined. Was it a hit parade? Not really. This is actually a very cohesive album and,although not obviously conceptual follows a loose theme of adult realizations of poverty,romance and sexuality. In a lot of ways it lays a lot of hardness down too,anticipating much of what would happen in the next decade.

Even though a variety of styles are presented this is also in essence a funk/soul album. That has always been George Michael’s true colors when you get right down to it. And on every song here it gives it every single chance he can. Much to the delight of people like me who listen to it. One of a number of excellent AND popular musical moments of 1987!


Faith is an album that painted George Michael as an artist who was not only extremely diverse in his grooves. But also did musical diversity well. And always kept his distinctive flavor intact. His recording career would actually be fairly sporadic after this, as he became involved in elongated record company disputes. And its no lie that George Michael did some amazing albums during the 90’s as well. It hasn’t been a year since his passing yet. And as with Prince, its taking its time feeling real. Yet Faith, with all its energy and high funkativity, is an album that never seems to stop feeling real.

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