Tag Archives: Jamaaladeen Tacuma

Bosses Of The Bass: Andre’s Top 12 Funk/Jazz/Soul Bass Players

Space Bass

Ever since my fourth grade music teacher Mrs. Gockle forced me to give up the upright bass due to her fascination with the melody based violins and violas? A deep life long interest in the bass as a musical instrumental emerged. Started listening for it closer in my fathers jazz records. And it was the foundational element in my favorite form of music-funk.  As time went on? I understood the sound it made to be so flexible,it could bring the melodies right out of the rhythms it created-when in the right hands of course.

As an adult? I’ve gravitated towards listening for how the bass is used on a song. It may have something to do with the old saying about how funk/soul lovers want to turn up the bass with rock fans prefer to turn up the treble. Since my understanding of the bass is almost totally oral rather than academic? The bass players I’m talking about here today may not all be the most renowned or well know. Though many of them are. These are people who have a distinctive approach that just reaches my type of musical ear. So here are my twelve (current) bosses of the funk bass.

James_Jamerson

James Jamerson is one of those bass players even non instrumentalist music lovers can pick out of the crowd in a second. Just listen to the opening of Motown hits he played on like “My Girl”,”Reach Out I’ll Be There”,”Don’t Mess With Bill” and “Just My Imagination”? And you understand how this key member of Motown’s now iconic Funk Brothers house band opened up the melodic possibilities of the electric bass probably more than anyone of his day. Jamerson’s sound probably got stuck in my consciousness those mornings half asleep going into town,from our family summer camp,in 1991 listening to the radio’s Motown Monday’s before I even realized it.

Larry Graham

Larry Graham,Bay Area bass player extraordinaire for Sly & The Family Stone,basically created the slap bass approach to playing that became one of the rudiments of the 70’s funk sound. Even before venturing out on his own with Graham Central Station,a solo career and session playing with Prince later on? Larry had already innovated the fuzz bass as well with the Family Stone’s breakout hit “Dance To The Music”. He’s probably one of the most renowned and famous funk bassist ever of course. And whatever I hear other bassists playing after? In some way it comes down to Larry in the end.

Bootsy Collins

Bootsy Collins,having spanned playing with the JB’s and than George Clinton’s P-Funk,picked right up in terms of bass innovation where Larry Graham left off. Bootsy’s effect on how I listen to music is one of personality. Rock musicians often call themselves guitar gods. And if I ever wanted to use such a term? Bootsy,with his glittering outfits and superhero like persona,is something of a bass god in that regard. He doesn’t just slap the strings. He pops out thundering,round tones. He snarls his bass like a guitar as well. Collins therefore probably has the most flexible and diverse style of playing the electric bass than many that I’ve heard.

Louis Satterfield

Fellow Earth Wind & Fire member Verdine White once said that everything he learned about bass came from this man,Louis Satterfield. One thing that really makes Satterfield fascinating to me is that he plays two low toned musical instruments: the trombone and the upright/acoustic bass. Often regarded more as a member of the iconic Phenix Horns,Satterfield has a long history playing for Chicago blues greats before essentially becoming the musical godfather of the totally rhythmic experience the bass played in EWF during their key years of the 70’s.

Wilton Felder

Wilter Felder,speaking of horn players,was only known to me to be a bass player as well when my blogging partner Rique informed me one day that Felder played bass on the Jackson 5’s first hit “I Want You Back”. As a bass player? Wilton did the reverse of what Louis Satterfield did. He helped to bring his melodic saxophone approach to his bass playing. Quite appropriate with the key role all the Crusaders played in late 60’s/early 70’s Motown-a label whose music always had a core of the melodic style of bass playing.

Michael Henderson

Michael Henderson,a musical disciple of James Jamerson,helped me to completely come to  terms with my understanding how the bass could be a powerful compositional instrument. Henderson played with Stevie Wonder,Miles Davis,Aretha Franklin and Dr.John in his earlier years before venturing out on his own solo career as a singer. He continued the tradition of melodic bass playing that came directly from his Motown education. And than took it onto a career as a premiere funk performer as well as being an instrumentalist.Louis-Johnson

Louis Johnson,much like James Jamerson before him,entered into my subconscious without me even fully realizing it the very first time I heard Michael Jackson’s “Billie Jean”. Johnson’s major contribution to my understanding of the bass came from his fusion of Larry Graham’s slap bass approach with the melodic innovations of Jamerson. This man was a monster play in the Brothers Johnson with his guitarist brother George. Not to mention an enormously important part of Quincy Jones’ iconic Westlake Studios instrumental crew who shaped much of the way I hear pop,funk and soul of the 70’s and 80’s

Bernard Edwards

Bernard Edwards,late of Chic and partner to iconic musician/producer Nile Rodgers in that band,probably did more for innovating the disco bass style within the musical sub-genre of funk than anyone else in his day. One of my very favorite basslines in fact comes from Edwards-the slippery jazz oriented intro to Chic’s 1977 hit “Everybody Dance”. Pretty much every electric bass player today playing danceable pop music has something of Edwards in what they’re playing.

Marcus Miller

Marcus Miller not only helped engineer the early 80’s comeback of Miles Davis. But he also went on to become a star producer and bass player for Luther Vandross at the same time. All before launching his own solo career in the 90’s up to the present day. What gets me about Marcus is how he took the slap bass approaches of funk players such as Larry Graham and Louis Johnson and bought jazz improvisation into the equation-a more hyper melodic alternative to earlier slap bass jazz icon Stanley Clarke. As a multi instrumentalist,he was also able to construct heavily funkified soundscapes with the bass as it’s core rhythmic element as well.

Mark King

Mark King was key of bringing of bringing the fast paced,jazzy slap bass style of Stanley Clarke and Marcus Miller into the new wave world as the bandleader for the UK’s jazz/funk/pop band Level 42 during the early/mid 1980’s. Also quite a fluid composer,King was a bass player that I came to love and appreciate within the last decade. And has actually helped me a great deal to understand new wave/synth pop as often being an instrumental outgrowth of American funk.

© Sasa Huzjak

Jamaaladeen Tacuma came out of jazz great Ornette Coleman’s 70’s and 80’s group Primetime to have his own solo career in the 1980’s. Tacuma bought together the free harmelodic approach of Ornette to his bass playing. Listening to his abstract slaps,thumps and vamps really fuel my imagination on just how much the electric bass can really do.

Peter Muller 2

Peter Muller,Berlin resident and modern day bassist,is one of my most recent discoveries. Muller’s sound comes out of the slap bass flower that Larry Graham got going almost half a century ago now. And he’s channeled it all into the jazz-funk revival that’s grown out of the smooth jazz production approach and is currently independently releasing some seriously strong bass oriented jazz/funk albums that have really peaked my interest as a listener.


While I am aware that people such as Stanley Clarke and the late Jaco Pastorious didn’t make this list? Well,these are only the bassists that had the most personal musical influence on me. And the appreciation of what we listen to and for in the music in our lives has a highly individual approach too. At the same time? If you can dance to the beat of the drum? Your probably already on the road to being able to pop to the beat of the bass line as well.

2 Comments

Filed under Bernard Edwards, Bootsy Collins, Crusaders, Earth Wind & Fire, Funk, Funk Bass, Jamaaladeen Tacuma, James Jamerson, Jazz, Larry Graham, Louis Johnson, Louis Satterfield, Marcus Mller, Mark King, Michael Henderson, Motown, Peter Muller, Wilton Felder

Andre’s Funk Essentials: Mixing It Up With The Groove’s Greatest Hits

funk

Funk has long been something that I’ve viewed as being an album oriented genre-one that blends uptempo dance music and jazzy or blues oriented ballads that has a certain approach to rhythm. But is often built around a certain concept as well. While funk albums has always been part of the family musical experience? I only fully understood funk as a specific genre due to compilations albums. In fact have often stated that at that place and time in the mid 1990’s? The only feasible and fiscally practical way in which to experience funk was through different types of compilations.

Much the same as you’d have with full length albums? The nature of compilations of pretty diverse when it comes to the funk genre. Funk is found on various artists compilations that otherwise consist mostly of rock,jazz and blues songs. They can be found on soundtracks in much the same manner. While in the 90’s there was not only a major up-swell of various artists compilations that were all funk, but also a series of compilations by a single funk band/soloist. Tracing down the timeline of where I personally started with the music? Here is a list of the various varieties of funk compilations that inspired me along the journey into the groove.


Funk Essentials

It was a cassette dub of this album from my dad, playing on the car stereo on the way home from a family trip from the city of Portland. I’ve discussed this on my previous blog The Rhythmic Nucleus. What still amazes me is that I could listen to songs such as “Let’s Star The Dance”,”Rigor Mortis” and “Flashlight” were all from a band actually called the Funk Essentials. Still this served it’s intended purpose with me: to whet the appetite to explore the artists within. And through BMG Music Service’s well stocked lineup of Funk Essentials compilations for individual artists I was able to take that journey a bit later

Heatwave Greatest hits

          Having already been exposed to Heatwave’s Central Heating album on 8 Track tape as a child? This album was a cassette of my mothers when she was unable to find that album on another format. While featuring the biggest hits from that album? It was my first exposure to classics such as “Boogie Nights”,”Always And Forever” and the 1980 jam “Posin’ ‘Til Closin”. It also led me on the path to other full length Heatwave albums like their 1982 masterpiece Current. The music of Rod Temperton and the late Johnnie Wilder have had an incalculable effect on how I perceive funky songwriting and composition.

Michael Jackson - Anthology (1986)

It’s very likely that Michael Jackson represented my very first introduction to funk music and I wasn’t even aware of it. His music was a direct link to me for the music of Berry Gordy’s Motown records where he began his career onward to Quincy Jones and the Westlake studio crew of musicians such as bassist Louis Johnson (one half of the Brothers Johnson of “Stomp” fame) and Greg Phillinganes (renowned session player for the likes of Eric Clapton,Stevie Wonder and his own solo albums Significant Gains and Pulse) as well as Toto’s Steve Lukather.

Jackson 5 Anthology

On these Motown sessions? People like the Mizell Brothers (who’d go on to work with jazz great Donald Byrd) and members of The Jazz Crusaders in Joe Sample and Wilton Felder provided the instrumental power and excitement to songs such as Michael’s early solo hits such as funked up show tunes such as “All The Things You Are” to epic fare such as “We’re Almost There” and “Take Me Back”. Not to mention a roll call of Jackson 5 triumphs such as “I Want You Back”,”Mama’s Pearl” and “Dancing Machine” along with far lesser known but still powerful songs such as “Looking Through The Windows”,”Get It Together”,”Whatever You Got,I Want” and “Body Language”.

Best Of Earth Wind & Fire Vol.1

As with The Jacksons? Some songs from Earth Wind & Fire were part of my musical core from the outset. Yet it was the experience of borrowing this vinyl from my dad in my early teens that really got me started on exploring this band. Songs such as “Shining Star”,”Fantasy”,”Can’t Hide Love” and “Getaway” were completely new to me at the time. Cannot diminish the excitement of hearing them for the first time. Add to that viewing the inner gate fold sleeve of this vinyl to see the joyous expressions of the band before I even knew names like Ralph Johnson,Al McKay,Larry Dunn or even Maurice White.

Parliament-Tear_The_Roof_Off_1974-1980

It was the Funk Essentials series that led me to this. During 1995 the name George Clinton was ringing through my head all the time. And this particular album was my entry point into the world of Parliament. Of course some of these songs lyrically made little sense to me. But it didn’t take the liner notes to begin to understand that characters such as Sir Nose,Starchild,Mister Wiggles and Dr.Funkenstein were part of a vast concept Clinton had set up that spanned across the Parliament albums as a whole. This really elevated my understanding of funk as an album based genre. And therefore was one of the key individual artist-based compilations that entered into my world at the time.

Move To The Groove

Interestingly enough? My father was more attracted to the holographic CD cover for this set than he seemed to be with the music within. Yet during the spring and summer of 1996? My father and I actually began our many musical conversations while listening to the songs here. It was my very first exposure to artists such as Roy Ayers,Mandrill and George Duke. These artists would become hugely significant in my expanding musical explorations in years to come.

Prince The Hits-B-Sides

Always compelled by the multi talented and expansively funky Prince Rogers Nelson,this album really showcased for me how versatile and entrancing  this innovator of the Minneapolis sound’s music truly was. Not only that but it included a number of non album B-sides on the final disc-the best of which (for me anyway) were the magnificent “17 Days” and “Erotic City”. When I collected all of Prince’s full length albums? I actually sold my original copy of this for pocket change basically. But I recently bought it again-not only because of the B-sides but simply because it’s a compilation of songs I still love to listen to set up this way. And from the look of the back? I feel as if I might’ve bought back my own copy I sold so many years ago.

Rick-James-Greatest-Hits

Seemed only natural to explore the music of Rick James during the same time as Prince’s. Interestingly enough? This particular collection was one of the very first CD’s bought into our home in 1990 when my father got his first CD player as a Christmas gift. It took me six more years to get into it. While I danced and hummed along to “Give It To Me Baby”,”You And I”,”Cold Blooded” and my favorite at the time “17”? Listening to this man’s lyrics provided me with a bucket list of things I would never even think of doing myself. Good example to me of funk that was almost totally lyrically un-relatable for me.

Nuyorican Soul

This mixture of Latin style acid jazz music of the mid 90’s was again something that my father purchased-during a time when both of us were on trajectories of exploring funk and it’s many tributaries. While not every one of these songs made a lasting impact on me? Singer India’s performance on the song “Runaway” helped me to understand something Roy Ayers,who also appears on this album, would continue to teach me later: how funk functioned in the context of the disco era.

Pure Disco Volume 1

It was a family friend,the late Janie Galvin,who first loaned us this CD. A lot of the songs and artists I knew well at this point. At the same time it was first hearing of Diana Ross’s amazing disco-funk extravaganza “Love Hangover”. Not to mention my introduction to two artists who would become enormous parts of my musical future in the UK group Imagination and the incomparable Teena Marie.

Star Time

I’d been reading over and over again about this man who,by 1997 I only knew three songs by. Only after being fully educated on how this man was essentially responsible for funk and hip-hop on his own? I went for it and purchased the highly recommended James Brown box set. I don’t know if I have words to described the feeling of what hearing “Think”,”Let Yourself Go”,”Talkin’ Loud And Sayin’ Nothin'”,”The Payback”,”Get Up Offa That Thing” and “It’s Too Funky In Here” for the first time. Perhaps I was more than a little late in the game to James Brown. At the same time? It actually opened the door for another,deeper stage in my understanding of the thoroughly instrumental structure of funk.

JB's Funky Good Time

On the way back from an long road trip to New York State? The two CD’s were part of the soundtrack for the trip home. At the time? I found some of these long instrumental jams a bit monotonous. Though I was deep into James Brown at this time? The idea of repetition in funk and being “on the one” was an element of the music’s core I could only take in limited doses. Still this was very educational for broadening my ability to listen to extended instrumental numbers. Somehow? The song I found myself doing a total call and response to on that road trip was “More Peas”. Today with the JB’s? Can hardly get enough of them. Proof of how funk can evolve a music lover fast!

Funk Essentials 1999

This discount compilation,found at Sam’s Club I believe,had one song on it that I kept repeating over and over again. And that was Tom Browne’s “Funkin For Jamaica”. This was a song and artist I wanted to know more and more about. This was a direct line to some of my more recent explorations of the last decade or so of artists such as Bernard Wright,Lenny White and Weldon Irvine.

Gramavision Jazz,Funk & Composers of Distinction

From solo projects by P-Funk’s Bernie Worrell onward? Grammavision was a label I was beginning to investigate during the late 1990’s. This compilation of my fathers provided me with a song by an artist named Jamaaladeen Tacuma called “Trouble” that really caught my ear. Tacuma’s music is one of my more recent investigations. And all because of this one little song that simply never left my mind upon hearing it.

Luaka Bop

The new millennium had officially arrived with this album-a free giveaway to my father from Bull Moose records,the local Maine record haunt. One song on this album excited my father so much he gleefully gave me the “you’ve GOT to hear this” routine. The song was “Masturbation Session” by a band called Arepa 3000-a P-Funk style number sung in Spanish. It was my first (and one of very few) exposures to funk sung in a completely foreign language.


After the year 2000? Compilations no longer provided any influence in my musical experiences. Full length albums were generally the route I was beginning to go on from then on- with my burgeoning interest in reissue CD’s and used vinyl. Interestingly enough? That was the year I received my GED diploma after eight years of home/un-schooling. My funk education directly coincided with my academic education: from 1993 through 2000.

One thing my blogging partner Henrique and I often discuss is how most people seem to either understand funk as a musical fad heavily connected to the disco era,nor even worse know nothing about it at all. After writing this? I am proud that funk,a music based so fully in rhythm,was as strong a musical influence on my life as rock ‘n’ roll is for the majority of people so it seems. Going from collections of songs to coherent album statements? It’s been an exciting journey which wound up with me discussing individual songs today,only in music terms,here on this blog. My own advice? Never fear changing up the groove in your own life!

~

1 Comment

Filed under 1980's, 1990s, Boogie Funk, compilation albums, Funk, George Clinton, Heatwave, James Brown, Michael Jackson, P-Funk, Prince, Rick James

Anatomy of THE Groove 11/7/2014 Andre’s Pick: “Trouble” By Jamaaladeen Tacuma

As a bass player for free jazz saxophone innovator Ornette Coleman’s band Prime Time,Jamaaladeen Tacuma bought the idea of funk’s “bass up front” ethic to Coleman’s harmolodic approach to music during the late 70’s and early 80’s. Especially since he’d already come to Coleman after playing for Charles Earland during his teens in his native Philadelphia  In 1984,the musically precocious Tacuma went out on his own with his group Cosmetic,and pursued an accompanying solo career.His sound grew heavily funk oriented during these this time. In 1991,he released an album called Boss Of The Bass. This album featured a more hip-hop based new jack swing groove-closer to  a harder edged Chuckii Booker than Ornette Coleman. One of the songs on the album stood out not only from this,but also as  social barometer for it’s time frame. It was appropriately called “Trouble”.

Starting out with Tacuma’s bass revving like a motorcycle engine the slow,thick,drum machine and electric slap bass fueled funk jam gets into gear as as the deep,husky soul singer Aziz’s vocals suddenly come on declaring “we’ve got trouble all over the land,we’ve got to make a stand”. The lyrics present the theme of an article in the “dirty press” and and asking why poverty is so ascendant when very few can live like “heirs to a throne”. After the two succeeding choruses,there are two instrumental breaks.  The first showcases Tacuma playing a dirty,snarling funk slap bass solo. The second is begins with a sample of a TV news report talking about an increase in the nuclear arms race before going into an electronic piano solo from Kae Williams Jr-late of the late 70’s/early 80’s  funk band Breakwater.  The main chorus of the song then repeats  itself until the song fades out.

The years between 1991 and 1993 showcased an America that was under pressure in terms of being able to maintain a universalist attitude between all fifty states. In more rural areas,you had the effect of trickle down economics causing mass decay. And in more urban areas,racial profiling and violence became a fact of life all too often. During the time the USSR fell,than US President George Bush got America involved in Operation: Desert Storm in Iraq and than came the senseless beating by Rodney King by the LAPD-following by the LA riots.  Hip-hop has been addressing the matters associated with this for many years before this-from KRS-1 and Public Enemy’s Chuck D. This song bought that sense of social urgency of political hip-hop to a more jazz inclined crowd,many of whom had difficulty with the blunt and sometimes profane language of rap.  And it framed this lyrics,set to a more 60’s/70’s preacher style of lyrics to a hard late 80’s style of funk.

Still this song retains hip-hop’s angrier tone in some of the lyrical content. Aziz’s blunt vocal approach has a very direct flavor to it. Also,while the lyrical content seems directed at working adults-perceiving the ills of the world and their community as they live their lives rather than idealist young people looking to change the world immediately,the lyrics maintain some of the “don’t believe the hype” attitude of late 80’s/early 90’s hip-hop. Generationally speaking? This isn’t surprising since Tacuma and his band mates were generally latter day baby boomers similar to Prince and Michael Jackson-often referred to today as “Generation Jones”. They were the same age as first generation hip-hoppers. So it was only natural that the lyrics of this song reflect both hope for the future and a sense of worried earnestness. Having first heard this closer to it’s time on one of my father’s jazz sampler CD’s? I’ve long considered this an unsung “people music” message song funk anthem for the early 1990’s!

Leave a comment

Filed under 1980's, 1990s, Funk, Funk Bass, Hip-Hop, Jamaaladeen Tacuma, Jazz, Jazz-Funk, Ornette Coleman, Public Enemy