Tag Archives: Jamaica

Funk Revelations Of 1987: ‘Hold On To Love’ by Third World

Image result for third world hold on to love

By this time Third World had been around ten years and,since they started off their career with a cover of a Gamble & Huff song, it made sense that Kenny and Leon would wind up the producer/writers of half of this album. Even with the band producing their own half this album doesn’t have the same high energy electro funk flavors of the excellent previous album Sense of Purpose and instead this is music that relies more on atmosphere and texture than on rhythms and grooves. “The Spirit Live”,”Hold Onto Love” and “Simplicity” all have elaborate arrangements than even typical pop-reggae.
There’s also Christian/gospel messages underlying these tunes which actually work in an interesting way with the bands Rastafarian back round surprisingly. As for the other two Gamble & Huff tracks here there’s the hardcore funk/reggae jam in “Corruption” which conjures up images of a Jamaican version of the O’Jays making music in the mid 80’s. “Manners” is a great uptempo Philly jam as only Gamble & Huff could deliver it that show that,no matter what your beliefs are treating other people right is always the way to go and it was a great plea for humanism in the “me” generation.
Of the songs Third World provided themselves, they bring the Minneapolis connection  back into their sound (in the most lean possible way) on “We Could Be Jammin’ Reggae”. This groove is also home to some amazing jazzy Latin chords too. “Get Outta Town” and “Reggae Radio Station” are the more reggae oriented of the songs here. And again showcase subtlety over showmanship. From the sound and lyric of “Pyramid” there’s no doubt that it comes from a similar musical environment as Michael Jackson’s “Liberian Girl” from his album Bad which by sheer coincidence was released the same year.
The album ends again on a somewhat gospel/Rastafarian combination (only this time from the bands own pens) on “Peace Flags”. Third World were always a reggae band who worked with American soul/funk artists such as Stevie Wonder, members of Kool & The Gang and on this album Gamble & Huff. Even still, this album shifts Third World’s  focus on melodic harmonics over rhythmic music/vocal approaches. It’s a different kind of Third World and at the very least it was a good example of a band progressing as opposed to remaining in the same place just to keep an audience.
Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Third World

Exodus At 40: Remembering The Year Bob Marley & The Wailers Really Got People Jammin’

Bob Marley is a figure whom I’ve never covered on Andresmusictalk. Reggae is a musical genre that grew out of ska,an Afrocentric style of rock n roll, as well as from Marley’s own interest in funky soul artists such as Curtis Mayfield. And the idea that Afrocentric music could carry strong political and spiritual messages. By the mid 70’s, Marley & The Wailer’s had already more or less defined reggae with standards such as “Get Up,Stand Up” and “No Woman,No Cry”. During my life time, Marley and reggae in general was embraced by what seemed to be stoner rock fans. There’s another way to look at it too.

After seeing the 2012 documentary Marley, it became clear how important reggae and the music made by Marley and the Wailers made was to the black community around the world, and not just to punk musicians or other rock people. Marley had nearly been assassinated for advocating a specific political candidate in his own country not too long before the Exodus album came out. And with his pan Africanism-being inspired in his “Redemption Song” by a speech given by Jamaican pro black activist Marcus Garvey, Marley made total sense to me upon reviewing Exodus on Amazon.com.


One could never say Bob Marley wasn’t charismatic. By the time the 70’s was drawing to it’s concluding years,the music he was making with the Wailers were not only a rallying cry and inspiration to every from Stevie Wonder to The Clash. But his devotion to his cause was even beginning to have the power to affect political change in his native country.

However badly needed that was Marley’s position as a cultural icon began to have an effect on his life,as violence and death threats loomed on a man whose stance was primarily about peace. So he did what he always did-reached out with his music to bring in a yet larger audience in some surprising ways.

In many ways this album found it’s huge commercial success by representing reggae achieving it’s most fullest flower. If that’s what one is looking for “Natural Mystic”,”So Much Things To Say”,”Guiltiness” and “The Heathen” sure have a lot of that. Bob’s recent experiencing with the continual political corruption in Jamaica were spoken very loudly here.

And by the time we get to the monstrously churning,funky title song he’s yearning yet more for Rastafarian redemption yet again. On the next half there are concessions towards the more commercial.”Jamming” might be Bob’s most popular and one of the poppiest reggae numbers but a great one. And one of my favorite Bob Marley tunes.

“Turn The Lights Down Low” add some light electronics to the sensual flavor of the tune and the albums ends with two more unforgettable Marley anthems in “Three Little Birds” (another of my favorites by Marley) and a medley of “One Love/People Get Ready”. This self produced effort had the strong effect of both remaining true to the music Bob Marley popularized but also using some contemporary production and musical elements to add extra musical seasoning to his sound.

I’ve heard some hardcore Bob Marley fans say that they feel this album is a little too commercial for their tastes. From what I’ve heard I don’t think Marley had anything to do with being commercial. Popular?For sure. But commercial no. And because of his willingness to expand musically to get his message across,I think albums like this actually play a good part in helping the audience understand that difference.


The musical legacy of Bob Marley was already carved in stone long before Exodus came out. But when the album did come out 40 years ago last month, it helped break reggae into the mainstream just as the same thing was happening to the concurrent musical movements of punk and disco. Viewing the contents of albums such as this as having a basis in soul and funk also makes sense. Since much of disco had the same origin points as well. So this strong example of strong and unique “people music” coming from a strong pro black stance makes Exodus a vital part of the late 70’s musical landscape.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Bob Marley