Tag Archives: Mark “Mr.Mark” Adams

Slave@40: All I Had To Learn And Everything I Know From A April 1977 Funk Album

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Slave’s debut album is going to celebrate its 40th anniversary a month from now. In fact,2017 is going to be a 30th and 40th anniversary for a lot of classic funk albums. This Dayton,Ohio funk band is one that I first learned about through Rickey Vincent’s major funk literary tome in the late 1990’s. The album cover album had me seeking out the CD reissue still available at the time. Wound up picking it up at an HMV record store while vacationing with my family in Montreal. It was an eleven hour car ride back to where we lived then. So it was just one of many CD’s I listened to on the way back.

Six years ago coming this Sunday,the bands bassist Mr.Mark passed away. And in four months,it’ll be the anniversary of of guitarist Mark Hicks,known as Drac.  It was he who formed the band with Steve Washington,funky innovator of the electric trumpet,in 1975. This high school band got signed to the Cotillion label in 1977 and released their self titled debut the same year. It put them on the R&B and pop charts with the funk classic “Slide”. The album mixed jazzy and rock elements into the sound of funk. At the same time,its recently been made clear I had a lot to learn about this album at one time.

Slave is always an album I’ve loved to listen to. But in the now 20 years since I purchased my copy of it, its an album I’ve only returned to about three or four times in those years. Since beginning music blogging and knowing more musically inclined people,its helped in reviewing albums and songs. On both this blog and sites such as Amazon.com. Usually, I endeavor to present Amazon.com reviews on this blog that reflect well on the music being discussed. Today,I am going to present to you an Amazon review that I wrote of this album that reflects an understanding that has definitely been grown since it was written.


This CD has been in my collection for many years.Bought for it’s reputation and it’s fantastic album cover-one of my all time favorites.”Slide” is a great yowling funk tune,cool gimmicky bicycle horns too.”Screw Your Wig On Tight” is cool too-rocks a little harder but cool.As for the rest of the album?Well it jams and jams and jams and jams and jams and jams and JAMS!!!!!All Slave tend to do on this album is endless funky jamming-very true to the form but kind of boring sometimes.Those in the state of mind to hear singable,written tunes won’t find music to their liking here.

‘Slave’ is an album you put on after you’ve been listening to James Brown and early Tower Of Power.It is not in keeping with the funk of the late 70’s and what other music Slave would become known for in the years to come.There are no electronics and even a hint of dance or pop influence here-it’s straight ahead classic funk and nothing more. Amateurish,plain jane horn heavy funk without the frills so keep that in mind when you get this.


Its hard to believe that 12 years ago,I’d ever write a review calling anything Slave did “amateurish”. Of course,this was also around the time when I thought of the James Brown song “Get On The Good Foot” was dull because it repeated itself for far too long. Of course,that is an element of funk itself. Also,had no idea at that time that Slave were essentially a high school dance funk band in the beginning. Much as with Prince in his earlier bands,the songs he wrote tended to drag into into instrumental jams at times. Slave revealed more over the years since that review than even this.

Especially with their bass/guitar work melodic exchanges,have also come to realize just how far reaching songs like “Screw Your Wig On Tight” and “Separated” actually are in their funk. Along with grooving ballads such as “The Happiest Days”. Within two years,Slave had Steve Arrington aboard. And the band became masters of melodic funk such as “Just A Touch Of Love” and “Watching You”. On their first album however,it finds the band in a very different places that’s rawer and very powerful. And represents the band with the most hardest,instrumentally based type of funk.

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Anatomy of THE Groove for 6/5/2015: “Don’t Stop” by Brian McKnight

It wasn’t too long ago that I paid absolutely no mind whatsoever to the musical output of Brian McKnight. He seemed to be one of many groups and soloists who came out of the early/mid 90’s contemporary pop/soul scene. Most of these artists came across as possessing a docile performance ethic. And possessing little to no vocal and/or musical vitality. Without any undue cruelty? These artists didn’t seem capable of creating much in the way of uptempo dance music, let alone anything that was all that funky at all. One night while channel surfing half a decade ago,however? I came across The Brian McKnight Show.

This was an interview show at at contemporary artists involved in the creative process of music. Watching it a bit? McKnight revealed himself to be the same kind of multi instrumentalist (not merely a synthesizer/drum machine programmer),producer and composer he would generally be interviewing on the show. Often showcasing the artists and himself playing piano,bass and guitar? This got me curious enough to seek out some of McKnight’s current music. One such album, More Than Words opened with a song that continued this change of mind in the form of “Don’t Stop”.

Beginning with a jazz  fusion style drum roll and synth-horn improvisation,the song goes into a pulsing drum beat (accenting by the snare on one occasion) that is accompanied by a thick,phat and very funky slap bass line mixed right up front. That drum then turns into a rolling dance floor friendly,slow groove while the rhythm guitar comes in to play the higher pitched variation of the bass line right along with it. Along with the fusion like intro introducing each chorus? Not to mention the electric piano accompanied refrain? This groove keeps grinding itself into the listeners subconscious until it finally comes to an end.

While McKnights light (and often mildly over souling) vocal doesn’t add a great deal to the song itself? The way the chunky style bass/guitar funk groove holds up the songs extremely sensuous lyrical content provide some of the heaviest and strongest funk that Brian McKnight has ever produced in his long career. In a similar manner to Trombone Shorty’s “Long Weekend”? This songs slow grinding uptempo groove evokes the work of the underrated Ohio funk band Slave. Especially the bass playing of the late Mark “Mr.Mark” Adams. By focusing more on the instrumental groove than the vocals? This song,as Rique might put it,evokes a hip young middle class black American male circa 1980 driving around in a small car blasting Slave’s song “Watching You”. That plus it’s jazzy flavor make this a high water mark for instrumental funkiness for Brian McKnight

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