Tag Archives: spirituality

Andre’s Amazon Archive Special Presentation: ‘Lovesexy’ by Prince (1988)

Prince_-_Lovesexy

It was during the era of Sign O the Times that Prince was by far at his most musically exploratory and vital. He had one of his greatest bands during this period-the “Revolution Part 2” as I personally tend to call them in drummer/percussionist Sheila E.,longtime keyboardist Matt “Doctor” Fink,the late vocalist/organ player Bonnie Boyer,bassist Leaver Seacer Jr. and on sax and trumpet Eric Leeds and Matt “Atlanta Bliss” Bliston along with vocalist/dancer Cat. They not only provided an exciting stage presence for Prince during this era,but also expanded his musical sound.

 On the other hand? Prince was inwardly troubled. He recorded an album following the tour for his previous album. It had no title or name attached to it. And when it finally came out eight years later? It had been widely known (and bootlegged) as The Black Album. Prince apparently dream’t one night of a field with a shadow spelling out the word ‘god” written on it. Somehow this motivated him to shelve the rather profanely lyric’ed funk of that for an entirely different musical concept.

By posing on the album cover tactfully naked in front of three Georgia O’Keefe styled lilies-in the manner of Botticelli’s The Birth Of Venus? Prince not early earned a degree of censor from record stores. But also the perception his notorious narcissism had transgressed to full fledged megalomania. As with most things involving Prince? The entire conceptual tract of this album was nothing remotely that simplistic.

“Eye No” starts out by declaring “rain is wet/sugar is sweet/clap your hands/and stomp your feet”. After Prince himself declares over a psychedelic chorus that his voice sounds so clear because “there’s no smack in his brain” this intensely percussive funk groove-built around a dancing high bass line and Atlanta Bliss’s joyous muted trumpet solos. After this,with an echoed “OWW!” Prince goes into “Alphabet Street”,one of my personal favorite songs of his and this albums main hit.

Starting with some of the greatest funky drum/rhythm guitar I ever heard,a bluesy bass line introduces one of the many breaks which define the song. On the third break? There’s a brief wall of rock guitar before returning to the funk until fade out. “Glam Slam” starts out with a lightly percussive Arabic type melody with a Latin rock style guitar solo before going into a more new wave rock style melody that isn’t at all far removed from Little Red Corvette. “Anna Stesia” is a pensive,piano based jazz/pop type number with some unexpected major/minor chord transitions.

“Dance On” has a wild,high octane funk drumming and again a wall of rock guitar and bass seeming to bubble from below,but never to the front of the song with it’s gospel/soul organ led vocal chorus. The title track itself is an instrumentally thick contemporary synth funk number-again like an updated 1999 while the tender “When 2 R In Love”,the only holdover from the unreleased (at the time) Black Album is really the only stripped down number here. “I Wish You Heaven” is a somewhat ethereal arena rocker type with a powerful chorus while the closer “Positivity” is a jazzy,cinematic psychedelic soul/funk number with a gospel-type chorus at the end.

Throughout this album? Prince is completely playing the preacher. “Lovesexy” would seem on the surface to be some sort of “sexuality being next to godliness” type philosophy. He never defines it here. Lyrically there are constant references such as “I know there is a heaven and I know there is a hell” and “Love Is God/God Is Love/Girls and boys love god above” that reflect Prince’s embrace of the soul singers conflict between the secular and the spiritual. So its nothing unique in that respect. However on a more personal level it does seem that Prince was unsure what to make of his own revelation.

Prince seems to imply lyrically,throughout this album,a complete embrace of cynical paranoia where he is frightened of too much money,frightened of loosing it and frightened of the forces of evil. And those forces he combines into a character he describes in the end of the album as being called Spooky Electric. Musically speaking? Prince plays out his spiritual crisis to music that is far more loose than anything he’s done so far. His typically tight arrangements are replaced by a thick band oriented sound that can change in rhythm and melody almost on a whim.
In a way? That type of instrumentation is ideal in expressing the lyrical confusion this album seems to have. For reasons of which there are many interpretations,Prince also presented all nine songs on this CD onto one track. So the listener cannot jump between the totally different songs. Its one of his very best albums musically and is filled with memorable,highly funkified and even pop friendly songs. On the other hand,the lyrical confusion and aforementioned song presentation make this one of his less approachable albums.
Originally posted on June 8th,2014

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Filed under 1980's, Atlanta Bliss, Bonnie Boyer, drums, Eric Leeds, Funk, horns, Lovesexy, Matt Fink, Minneapolis, Minneapolis Sound, percussion, Prince, psychedelic soul, Sheila E., spirituality, Uncategorized

Andre’s Amazon Archive for 9/20/2014: ‘Apocalypse’ by Thundercat

Apocalypse

It has never ceased to delight me that since 2010 there has been a consistently high level of innovation happening within music. For one thing,indie developments of the past fifteen years aren’t so indie anymore. And musicians who have been waiting in the wings to emerge are again beginning to do so with new and exciting musical hybrids. This is especially true of the jazz/funk/soul spectrum. Stephen “Thundercat” Bruner-with a father and brother who’ve alternately played with the likes of Diana Ross,The Temptations,Stanley Clarke and so on is one of these people. Having been the bass player for thrash/funk/metal band Suicidal Tendencies with his brother Ron Thundercat re-upped as a solo artist in 2011. Rather makes sense if you think about it since metal and funk are more easily blended than one might think due to both music’s emphasis on a strong groove and being rooted in the blues. The difference is the approach-playing dirty (metal) or playing cleanly (funk). So this is Thundercat’s sophomore release. The question I have to ask myself in this situation is one asked before: why am I only hearing about Thundercat just now?

Produced with the help of Flying Lotus this album begins with “Ten Fold”,”Heartbreaks + Setbacks”,”The Life Aquatic”,”Special Stage” and the ambient styled “Tron Song”. These songs are build around harmonically rich swirls of electronic synthesizers-pulsing Moog type bass blending with Thundercat’s electric bass riffing. His high,ethereal voice keeps up with these melodically and rhythmically challenging grooves. The bass groove “Seven” is one of the speediest and most nimble I’ve heard on such a spare “nu jazz” number,apparently a funk hybrid I didn’t know the name to. “Oh Sheit It’s X” is brilliant,my favorite on here with it’s 70’s TONTO style Isley Brothers meets P-Funk mixture of retro synthesizers into a think funk groove with wonderfully elaborate melodies again. “Without You” is a much more spare mid western Minneapolis/Ben Sidran approach to funk-jazz-with it’s juxtaposed stop/start and steady rhythmic sound. “Lotus And The Jondy” is another deep groove with a heavy bump to it-another favorite. “Evangelion”,the intro “We’ll All Die” and the orchestrated closing epic of “A Message For Austin/Praise The Lord/Enter The Void”-tribute to the passing of Austin Topper Peralta are all ornately psychedelic style fusion numbers.

I don’t think I’ve ever heard an album recently that actually innovates it’s unique sound from an accumulation of the many musical innovations of the 60’s,70’s,80’s and even 90’s quite the way this album does. And it does so while sounding not contemporary but instantly somehow ahead of its time. This is a factor that has produced the pasts most enduring music. One of the best part is how he manages to blend nearly complete non-commercialism musically while writing,singing and playing songs that are melodic and highly memorable to the human ear and the human soul. The instrumentation here is very elaborate and expansive. Lyrically he takes on a rather pantheist level of spirituality and human self improvement completely in keeping with the funk era his music celebrates with elements of Eastern and Christian ideas. By blending together all the best elements of jazz,funk and psychedelia of the past Thundercat has made a masterpiece…that will likely be found in the electronica section of your record store. Today this is an excellent place to find unique and very funky and jazzy musical hybrids like this. A strong candidate for the most innovative funk/jazz album of 2013 thus far.

Original review posted on July 10th,2013

*For original review,click here!

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Filed under Funk, Funk Bass, Jazz-Funk, Thundercat